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Please keep the she-wolf caged

Centuries ago, the Chinese government implemented a form of slow torture by dripping water on its prisoners' heads, which, though seemingly innocuous, ultimately drove the detainees to the brink of insanity. It defined the notion of cruel and unusual punishment, an unprecedented strategy until this month, when Shakira, the hip-convulsing Latin singer, released her new album, "She Wolf."


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Students doubt CASE van availability

Seton Hall has many safety programs, including a transportation service known as the CASE van. While the CASE van was created to help students, some are discouraged by its lack of availability.


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Fire in Turrell

Four pies are suspected of causing a small fire to break out in Turrell Manor Sunday night.


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Rec arrest name revealed

As The Setonian previously reported, a Seton Hall student whose name has now been released, was taken into custody outside of the Richie Regan Athletic Center on Sept. 22.


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New SHUFLY driver takes the wheel

The SHUFLY welcomed William Toro as a new driver to its staff in August, and although he has been driving around South Orange for a few months, he is already working hard to accomodate students.


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Mugging victim gives insight

After being beaten by two male individuals on Eder Terrace and Wilden Place during his walk home last Tuesday night, sophomore Joshua Meyer wants action to be taken about the walk to Ivy Hill.


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Noise violations go to court

A Seton Hall student said he felt pressured into pleading guilty to a noise violation in South Orange Municipal Court where he was fined $233.


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Gossip web sites remain popular on campus

Juicy Campus met its end in February 2009 as sponsors backed out and denied the Web site the advertising revenue it needed to continue its gossip services, but multiple Web sites have sprung up to fill the gap.


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Karen O and crew get 'Wild' with soundtrack release

The wildly anticipated big screen rendition of Maurice Sendak's childhood staple "Where the Wild Things Are," will be putting audiences in awe on Oct. 16. Director Spike Jonze is pushing new boundaries with this film, bringing out a different side of childhood. He doesn't hesitate to show the scariness and confusion of being a kid, the loss of innocence and finding it again.

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