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Mickey Mouse turns 81 years young

The Walt Disney Company will be celebrating 81 years of its legendary cartoon character, Mickey Mouse this month. On Nov. 18, 1928 Mickey Mouse grabbed the attention of audiences by appearing in the first ever synchronized sound cartoon, "Steamboat Willie."


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Album sure to bring "Glee" to all

"Glee" owes much of its credit to the past, from television shows like "Freaks and Geeks" to movies like "Pretty in Pink" and "10 Things I Hate About You." It is also indebted to "American Idol," a competition that has aroused the self-confidence and aspiration of every teenager who sings a G-flat in the shower. The first soundtrack includes 17 songs from the show, which is themed around a high school glee club and performed by its talented cast.Though the vocal performances are of a finely-tuned caliber, listeners unfamiliar with "Glee" may prefer the original songs to the cover versions on the soundtrack. But the album's diverse mix of songs has its own appeal; where else would you find a mix tape that includes tracks from Neil Diamond, Young MC, REO Speedwagon and "Cabaret"? Non-Glee-club members can also appreciate the inventive choral arrangements on Journey's "Don't Stop Believin'" and the girls' background harmonies on the 1989 rap hit "Bust A Move." Avid watchers will remember the cute teacher, Will Schuester (Matthew Morrison), and his wildly entertaining dance moves as he raps on Kanye West's "Gold Digger," feel conceited star Rachel Berry's (Lea Michele) heartache as she sings into a mock microphone on Rihanna's "Take a Bow" and reminisce to the fast-paced routine led by cheer captain Quinn Fabray (Dianna Agron) to the Supremes' "Keep Me Hanging On." They'll relish the harmonies and recall the group's triumph on Queen's "Somebody to Love" and smile again at Will's bowling-alley duet with Kristin Chenoweth on Heart's "Alone."Missing from the soundtrack, though, are the memorable mash-ups of Bon Jovi's "It's My Life" with Usher's "Confessions" and Beyonce's "Halo" with Katrina, and the Waves' "Walking on Sunshine." A second volume of "Glee" music is set to hit stores next month and listeners can hope that these tracks will be on the new mix. Fans of Fox's radically flippant musical comedy show will love this soundtrack. This soundtrack includes a variety of well known songs from show tunes to pop culture from the past two decades. It's top notch singing is sure to keep people tuned in to the hit show and shoppers buying the soundtrack for everyone on their Christmas list.


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Tim Burton brings horror to MoMA

Ascend to the third floor of the Museum of Modern Art, past the topiary carved in the shape of a buck and enter through a doorway in the disguise of a monster's gaping jaws. Screams, horrific laughs and cries can be heard from the monster's throat, a hallway lined with screens showing the heroics of "Stainboy." Just beyond the viewing gallery is a backlight room with a trippy rotating carousel composed of various monster parts.


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Fire up the old Game Boy

What do the Frisbee, Monopoly, the Bicycle, G.I. Joe and the Easy Bake Oven all have in common? They are all toys that have found their way into the National Toy Hall of Fame. And now, Nintendo's Game Boy joins their ranks.


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Old blood gets fresh sound with remastered collection

The holiday season is steadily approaching and ‘tis the season for record companies to release the inevitable: box sets, remastered albums and DVD documentaries. In hopes that their product will make it onto fans' holiday wish lists, record companies will dig out the b-sides, live performances and extended or alternative artwork from albums, which offers both prospective and dedicated fans a new and extensive opportunity to investigate influential bands.


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Posner gets personal at SHU concert

For the first time in over three years, Seton Hall hosted a long-awaited on-campus concert on Nov. 6 featuring Detroit singer-songwriter Mike Posner for a crowd more personal than your typical house party. In front of a group so small that it was possible to be at the front and the back of the audience simultaneously, the charismatic Posner commanded the room and interacted with the students as if he was performing at Giants Stadium.


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Weezer returns with new attitude

Dressed as farm animals, Weezer rocked the Hammerstein Ballroom on Halloween night. After opening with "Hash Pipe," they played a solid 21-song setlist, which was full of fan favorites like "Undone-The Sweater Song," "Dope Nose," "Island In The Sun," and even deeper tracks like "Surf Wax America," "Tired Of Sex," and "Why Bother."


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Lil' Wayne raises the roof with "No Ceilings" mixtape

Lil Wayne delivered in true trick-or-treat fashion this Halloween, posting his "No Ceilings" mix tape to his website for all his fans to download for free. Like his enormously popular 2008 release, "Tha Carter III," this album brings forth the consistencies of Lil Wayne's music: contagious beats and clever, yet inflammatory, lyrics.


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Halloween movies all treats

This Halloween will mark the return of many strange rituals. It is the one weekend of the year when houses covered in spider webs are deemed appropriate; when the scarier people look, the better; when incredible candy binges are socially acceptable; when knocking on a stranger's door and asking for something for free is not met with hostility; and, of course, when virtually no dress code exists. In many respects, it is a wonderful holiday, and fortunately, the cinema has given us many resources to take in the ambiance of the season. From horror flicks and cartoons to science-fiction and comedy, Halloween offers something for nearly every viewer wanting to get into the trick-or-treat spirit. So brew up your apple cider and check out these Seton Hall favorites.Kevin Stevens can be reached at kevin.stevens@shu.edu.


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Theatre-in-the-Round gets spooked

Seton Hall's Theatre Council is teaming up with Alpha Phi Omega to present the first Haunted House-in-the-Round. Inspired by the strange architecture and ghosts stories surrounding the Theatre-in-the-Round, the haunted house idea "just made sense," said sophomore Theatre Council Secretary Marissa Breton.


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Metal chart toppers unite in horror

With Halloween upon us, many anxious moviegoers anticipate the return of the "Saw" horror series. This year, Jigsaw is back and the music is more brutal than ever. The soundtrack includes music from The Flood, Miss May I, Converge, Shadows Fall, Suicide Silence and many more top metal and hard rock bands. Although the previous soundtracks have not disappointed, this might just be the best and strongest yet.


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Hill High School Class of 2010

Seton Hall alum and former Arts and Entertainment Editor of The Setonian Jeff Fucci will host a charity event called Haunted Hill House"on Oct. 23-25 at his home in Carlstadt, New Jersey.In its third year, Haunted Hill House has become the largest backyard Halloween walk-through and performance in northern New Jersey, admitting over 1,500 visitors. The theme of this year's event centers around the fictitious Hill High School's homecoming dance. The dance is still on despite the recent disappearances of some students and a few break-ins within the school. Two characters from last year's event, Dr. Jack McKnight and Mr. Vincent Darcone, are back and posing as science teachers at Hill High. Unbeknownst to the school, these two are actually evil scientists determined to turn the dance into a sacrifice and open a portal to hell that will unleash evil into the world. Not one to miss out on the fun, Fucci is an actor in the show as well as its producer, playing the part of Vincent Darcone. His best friend and Haunted Hill House collaborator, Joe Cutalo, plays Jack McKnight. The rest of the cast and crew include volunteers, family members and theater students. Fucci began the project with Cutalo in 2007 after discovering that the haunted houses he loved to visit no longer existed. "When I was a kid, there were lots of these backyard haunted houses," he said. "Now there's no more." While Fucci had the ambition, he had no house. Everything fell into place once Fucci moved into his current residence in Carlstadt two years ago, which had been in his family for years. Upon discovering 100-year-old furniture in the attic and the basement, he knew he had found the perfect location for a haunted house."I said to Joe, ‘Why not bring this crazy furniture outside and build a haunted house in the backyard and do something for the community,'" Fucci said. The event has come a long way in its three years. The first one, back in 2007, consisted of only a backyard walk-through with no show or plot. While it was a successful first outing, Fucci and Cutalo saw the need for improvement. According to Fucci, there was not enough light, no sense of crowd control and confusion about where to exit."People kept tripping over tree roots because it was so dark," he said. "We were literally banging on things with sticks and whispering to people where to go." To improve the next year's event, Fucci and Cutalo got creative. They invented the characters Dr. Jack McKnight and Mr. Vincent Darcone and a storyline (he said fans of "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" will recognize that their story isn't completely original). They also decided to add a small show in addition to the backyard walk-through. But Fucci didn't want his haunted house to be all scares and no heart. "The kind of spectacle we were doing was fun, but it wouldn't be right without some kind of cause," he said.In its first year, Haunted Hill House partnered with Angel's Attic, which takes the profits from clothes donations and distributes them among other charities. The following year, they partnered with the Gift of Life International, which provides funding for heart surgeries to children in need all over the world. With generous donations from its visitors, the event raised over $2,000 for both charities. This year, all proceeds will go to the New Jersey Center for Food Action. Fucci, Cutalo, and their loyal band of volunteers plan to donate the money toward Thanksgiving dinner for needy families.This year, Haunted Hill House is located at 539 Hackensack Street in Carlstadt, NJ. The event will last from 7-9:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday and from 7-9 p.m. on Sunday. Admission is free and visitors are encouraged to donate. Dana Cassidy can be reached at dana.cassidy@student.shu.edu.


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Love, family issues in new SHU play

The university's first theatrical performance of the school year will be the rendition of screenplay writers George S. Kaufman and Moss Hart's "You Can't Take It With You." Directed by Dr. James P. McGlone, a Seton Hall theater professor, the play is a classic comedy that focuses on love. The story in short: girl meets boy, girl falls for boy.In the play Anthony "Tony" Kirby is establishing a government-sanctioned monopoly by buying all the land surrounding a competitor's factory to force him out of business. His only barrier is Grandpa Martin Vanderhof, an eccentric who refuses to sell his home. Grandpa's granddaughter Alice, a stenographer from a family of individualists, has fallen in love with Tony. When Tony proposes to Alice, she is ecstatic. Unfortunately, Tony's mother's stuck-up ways dampen Alice's enthusiasm and Tony fears that Alice's family will clash with his. Chaos ensues, as neither family is quite prepared for the other. Alice is played by sophomore Megan Hanson, a broadcasting major with a concentration in TV, and a double minor in public relations and theatre. "Alice is the female ingenue in the play. Essentially, Alice is the only normal one in her family," Hanson said. "She loves her family dearly but they're all a bit eccentric, and she feels hesitant about exposing them to her fiancé, Tony. A few people understand her family and the way they choose to live." When she auditioned for the role five weeks ago, Hanson said she wasn't sure which role she wanted."When you audition, you may have a certain role in mind that you'd like to play, but essentially you just audition, and the director places you where he sees fit," Hanson said. "I did have interest in playing Alice only because I had never played the role of the ingénue before. And honestly I wanted to test myself to see if I could take on a role like this." Freshman Kristen Velloza, a newcomer to the stage at Seton Hall, knew she was going to audition, but no idea when. During University Day, she decided to visit the theatre table and was encouraged to come out and audition. "I don't know what that has to do with my major, but I feel like speaking is a big part of diplomacy," Velloza said. "So you have to be able to speak in front of large audiences. Acting helps me build confidence by performing and speaking to people." Velloza said that she never got the character roles. "But it's fun for me to play those roles because they're not real life people; they're just there to make people laugh. It's cool to be someone else," she said. "The director gave me tips on how to play an alcoholic, it was like alcohol 101." Freshman Pat Daly replays a childhood memory when he steps into the role of Ed Carmichael, the son-in-law of Grandpa Martin. "Ed is always happy and willing to help out and I feel like that encompasses me very well," Daly said. "Ed is a funny guy, but he's very misunderstood. He likes to play music and efficient love for printing. Unfortunately, his zeal at the printing press gets him in trouble sometimes because he prints things without thinking about it."Daly, a diplomacy major, is a newcomer to the stage. Auditioning for the first play of the year was a spur of a moment decision influenced by a friend of his. "I've never done a play before," said Daly. "My friend Bill who's playing Paul asked if I wanted to go audition. So I thought I'd go and meet some cute girls and I ended up getting this part."Senior Rob Huryk, who plays Kolenkhov, said that while this wasn't his favorite play, he's learning to experience the new challenges in Seton Hall Theatre."I usually have a lot of fun, but this show isn't very fun for me," Huryk said. "I love comedies though." Kolenkhov is a ballet teacher straight out of Russia who has a thirst for higher artistic ability. He views everything as if nothing is up to his standards.Sarenia Hertilus is the only stage manager administering the play, and is a veteran when it comes to Seton Hall Theatre. This is her second year as stage manager and as a senior, she has decided theatre is what she wants to do for the rest of her life. "I don't get overwhelmed with having all the weight on my shoulders because it is my job. I plan on doing this for the rest of my life so it's nothing new to me," Hertilus said.Velloza added, "I am very excited about this production, and I hope that a lot of students and faculty hear about the show and attend one of the performances. We'd love and appreciate good crowds." The play will be performed in the Theatre-in-the-Round in the Bishop Dougherty University Center on Oct. 23, 24, 30, and 31 at 8 p.m. and on Oct. 25 and Nov. 1 at 2 p.m.Toneisha Friday can be reached at toneisha.friday@student.shu.edu.


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Get cultured with off-beat NYC museum exhibits

This year marks 50 years of groundbreaking modern art from the world famous New York City museum, the Guggenheim. When the white, jutting spiral shaped building was first erected on October 21, 1959, across from Central Park, the Upper East Side didn't understand the modern marvel among old New York classic architecture. While the plans for the building started in the early 40's, the grand opening didn't take place until a few months after the legendary architect Frank Lloyd Wright's death.

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