Seton Hall psychology professor hosts podcast on diversity and inclusion

Seton Hall Psychology Professor Marianne Lloyd hosted a nine-part podcast series addressing the topics of racial and cultural diversity and inclusion in education for Psych Sessions podcast.

In the podcast, Lloyd, who has a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology and has been a professor at the University since 2006, and six guests offer advice to guide professors and instructors toward a more inclusive learning environment with the goal of defeating racism in the classroom.

The podcast discusses whether educators and education departments are conscious of cultural and racial differences in society and whether the content itself is inclusive of the experiences of all students according to her research and own personal experiences as a professor.

Diversity issues are addressed throughout the episodes, including the use of language, awareness of discrimination and a lack of focus on racism in education.

Lloyd teaches her listeners different ways they can be vulnerable and open to change in a much different world than they may be used to as she stated in a preview podcast promoting the series.

In the podcast, she suggests changes to syllabus construction with the goal of being a better mentor to the BIPOC populations. She proposes altering course content itself to be more inclusive, and overall, how to create an environment where all students are being reached and feel they belong.

Lloyd described her experience throughout the process as one of the most rewarding highlights of her professional career.

Although on sabbatical this semester, Lloyd says she has picked up many new skills and techniques, especially regarding the COVID-19 pandemic. She says she plans to apply these to her own classrooms in the spring and encourages her colleagues to do the same.

“A few changes I will make include changing the readings to focus on a greater diversity

of experiences, an increased focus on belonging for all students and further explicit modeling of my own shortcomings in this work to discourage perfectionism from getting in the way of growth,” Lloyd said.

Lloyd said drastic changes need to be made, not only in the classroom and society but within the minds of individuals so that we all can grow. She said she advises her listeners and the students of Seton Hall specifically to, “start where you are and begin moving forward.”

Ben Carranti can be reached at benjamin.carranti@student.shu.edu

Author: Staff Writer

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