The Voice: SGA should make Town Halls a more common occurrence

The Voice


The event, held in the Chancellor’s Suite in the University Center, featured speeches by SGA leaders and saw both students and administrators attend. Following the speeches, there was an open question and answer session that allowed students to speak directly to the SGA and University administrators.

The topics discussed included graduation, recent problems with SHUFly and SafeRide and 24-hour study zones. One student, a Muslim woman, voiced concerns over not having a suitable space to pray. For more details on the Town Hall, see Page 4.

Overall, the event drew a sizable turnout – sentiments echoed by members of the SGA. The meeting was civil and informative, a worthwhile hour or so for those that stopped by.

It would be great if SGA held more of these events in the future. President Teagan Sebba said one is usually held each semester, but why stop there?

Monday saw plenty of students issue complaints and questions that they rarely have a chance to have answered. While far from every answer given by SGA members and administrators was complete – Sebba said she couldn’t get into details on her progress in trying to reshape graduation plans – the gathering allowed students to speak and share ideas in an honest, face to face setting. Let’s have more of that.

It was a refreshing change of pace from students sounding off on Twitter; swarming Seton Hall’s mentions only to get the occasional response from an anonymous person in control of the University’s handle – not that there is anything wrong with that, either. Such tactics do work sometimes and even if when they don’t, using social media is a great way to get Seton Hall’s attention.

But so is showing up in person. The Town Hall was a much more formal alternative, providing students an opportunity to stay informed.

The more the SGA can encourage that, the better.


The Voice is intended to best represent the collective opinion of The Setonian’s editorial board. It is written by The Setonian’s Editor-in-Chief and Managing Editor.

Author: Editorial Board

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