Operation Opera

15036663_10154710407029889_1454706487108788908_n

Photo via Facebook/Jason Tramm

As part of the Classical Concert Series at Seton Hall, a concert version of Puccini’s famous Opera, Tosca will be coming to the South Orange Performing Arts Center (SOPAC) on Nov. 16. A lecture will be held at 5:30 p.m. with the concert to follow at 7 p.m.

The Classical Concert Series, a collection of four professional productions that come to SOPAC annually, is a longstanding tradition for SHU.

This year is unique because the Seton Hall University Choir, as well as three other Seton Hall students, will have the chance to be involved in the concert as part of the production. In years past, SHU students were only able to view the concert, not be a part of it.

According to Dr. Jason Tramm, the Seton Hall Choir director, “We’ve been cultivating this for the past couple of years and I think it is a wonderful collaboration between the Seton Hall ensemble and the Classical Concert Series.”

The Seton Hall Choir will act as the ensemble for the Opera which involves both onstage and off stage singing.

Gus Glasov, a senior philosophy major, will play the role of Spoletta, an evil henchman and secondary lead. Two other seniors, Chad Navarro and Devin McGuire, have minor roles.   

Freshman theater major and choir member Andrew Cates said, “I’m really excited for the Opera. It’s so cool that students have this type of opportunity to be a part of something so amazing.”

The event is part of the Seton Hall music program and is in collaboration with the Charles and Joan Alberto Italian Studies Institute.

According to Tramm, “We mix our departments together and we get amazing results. It’s kind of like Opera itself which is a mix of so many different art forms; singing, acting, stagecraft, costumes and orchestration That’s what makes Opera special.”

The soprano playing the role of Tosca, Rochelle Bard, is familiar to many students in the music program. In 2015, she sang with the Seton Hall Choir in their Prayer for Peace concert.

Steve Smith, a junior music major, said it can be daunting for some students to try and understand an Opera in another language. However, there will be subtitles posted on a screen so that the audience can understand the dialogue.

The story of Tosca is about a famous Opera singer named Tosca and her lover; a painter named Mario. An evil man named Scarpia vows to break them up, steal Tosca for himself, and kill Mario.

There will be a pre-concert lecture by Opera expert and close friend of Tramm, August Ventura.

In his speech Ventura said he aims to “bring the music and its relevance to life before the Opera begins to put things into context and give greater meaning to the music the audience will hear.”

Jordan Green can be reached at jordan.green@student.shu.edu.

As part of the Classical Concert Series at Seton Hall, a concert version of Puccini’s famous Opera, Tosca will be coming to the South Orange Performing Arts Center (SOPAC) on Nov. 16. A lecture will be held at 5:30 p.m. with the concert to follow at 7 p.m.

The Classical Concert Series, a collection of four professional productions that come to SOPAC annually, is a longstanding tradition for SHU.

This year is unique because the Seton Hall University Choir, as well as three other Seton Hall students, will have the chance to be involved in the concert as part of the production. In years past, SHU students were only able to view the concert, not be a part of it.

According to Dr. Jason Tramm, the Seton Hall Choir director, “We’ve been cultivating this for the past couple of years and I think it is a wonderful collaboration between the Seton Hall ensemble and the Classical Concert Series.”

The Seton Hall Choir will act as the ensemble for the Opera which involves both onstage and off stage singing.

Gus Glasov, a senior philosophy major, will play the role of Spoletta, an evil henchman and secondary lead. Two other seniors, Chad Navarro and Devin McGuire, have minor roles.   

Freshman theater major and choir member Andrew Cates said, “I’m really excited for the Opera. It’s so cool that students have this type of opportunity to be a part of something so amazing.”

The event is part of the Seton Hall music program and is in collaboration with the Charles and Joan Alberto Italian Studies Institute.

According to Tramm, “We mix our departments together and we get amazing results. It’s kind of like Opera itself which is a mix of so many different art forms; singing, acting, stagecraft, costumes and orchestration That’s what makes Opera special.”

The soprano playing the role of Tosca, Rochelle Bard, is familiar to many students in the music program. In 2015, she sang with the Seton Hall Choir in their Prayer for Peace concert.

Steve Smith, a junior music major, said it can be daunting for some students to try and understand an Opera in another language. However, there will be subtitles posted on a screen so that the audience can understand the dialogue.

The story of Tosca is about a famous Opera singer named Tosca and her lover; a painter named Mario. An evil man named Scarpia vows to break them up, steal Tosca for himself, and kill Mario.

There will be a pre-concert lecture by Opera expert and close friend of Tramm, August Ventura.

In his speech Ventura said he aims to “bring the music and its relevance to life before the Opera begins to put things into context and give greater meaning to the music the audience will hear.”

Jordan Green can be reached at jordan.green@student.shu.edu.

Author: Staff Writer

Share This Post On

Submit a Comment

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This