Transcendence’ transcends expectations

“Transcendence” addresses questions that humankind has faced for the last 20 years as technology has improved at an unprecedented rate.

The movie, starring Johnny Depp and Morgan Freeman, opened on April 18, but only garnered $4.8 million on opening night and may have trouble capturing an audience, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

Critics and audiences agree that “Transcendence” fails to be transcendent; however, I adamantly disagree.

The film is undoubtedly transcendent, which is defined as going beyond the limits of ordinary experience, simply because of the original experience created through the script, cinematography and music.

“Transcendence” should be ranked with highly acclaimed films such as “The Matrix” series and “Her” because of the true science-fiction nature of the film. However, the most rewarding aspect of the film is the innovation and imagination that makes the experience so unlike other films that question technology.

“Transcendence” takes a unique approach by having the characters attempt to create an emotionally responsive machine with a personality by uploading the contents of a human brain to a computer. However, as to be expected, humankind might not be ready for such a leap into the future.

Characters such as Joseph Tagger (Freeman) and FBI agent Buchanan (Cillian Murphy) fear that this machine will take over the world and is power hungry. From there, the movie follows what occurs when Will Caster (Depp) and his wife Evelyn (Rebecca Hall) succeed in creating a machine with a personality.

A terrorist group emerges and repeatedly attacks the group Evelyn has formed.

The film grapples with the questions involving technology and religion and how exactly one affects the other, if they do at all. “Transcendence” will ask viewers to question the enormous changes happening in the human race.

Watching movies rarely requires much thought, and a movie that requires active thinking and participation in the story is a welcome difference. Perhaps this movie will get the attention it deserves through word of mouth after the opening weekend.

Rebecca White can be reached at rebecca.white@student.shu.edu.

Author: Rebecca White

Rebecca White is from Orange County, California and is a senior majoring in Communication. She started out as the Pirate Life Copy Editor her sophomore year, worked her way up to Assistant Pirate Life Editor her junior year, and enters her senior year as Pirate Life Editor. She has been on the Dean’s List every semester and will graduate a semester early in December 2016. During her time at Seton Hall she has interned for CNBC and CupidsPulse.com, an entertainment site where she coordinates the celebrity interviews. She aspires to be a novelist while working in the publishing industry, either as a book editor or magazine editor.

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