Broad City’ has broad appeal

If the Comedy Central network’s greatest successes are its satire programs (“The Daily Show,” “Tosh.0”), their newest original series, “Broad City,” has to be considered a contender to make sketch comedy the network’s biggest attraction, at least potentially.

Focusing on the interactions of 20-somethings in New York City, “Broad City” is a sketch comedy that deserves high praise for its relatable nature. The sketches all somehow involve those awkward moments we all have encountered at some point, yet the characters take these moments to the nth degree and make the moment more outlandish than expected.

Starring Abbi Jacobson and Ilana Glazer, “Broad City” debuted Jan. 22, four years after beginning as a web series created by the two actresses. The program is fast-paced, often taking place on the city streets. The humor ranges from dramatic facial expressions to foul-mouthed, guttural punch lines.

Comedy Central has a history of sketch comedies going belly up after one season, or in some cases a few episodes. Shows such as “Nick Swardson’s Pretend Time” and “Important Things with Demetri Martin” flopped within a year on the network, even with star power. Plain and simple, original shows that aren’t satire-based or animated often have trouble finding a niche on Comedy Central.

However, “Broad City” has the potential to break this streak because of one major factor: the women of the cast. Most sketch comedies rely on male talent to be the bread and butter of the program, but this latest endeavor features mostly women in the lead, and they certainly have the ability to hold their own. Breaking away from that typical buddy-comedy dynamic could be just what “Broad City” needs to make its mark as a success. Amy Poehler, one of the most recognizable female names in comedy, is an executive producer of the show and is a definite explanation for why girl power is ever present on it.

“Broad City” is still in its infancy, but the potential for a breakout sketch comedy is certainly there. It could be the female answer to the success of the “Workaholics” bro-mance on the same network.

Brett Montana can be reached at brett.montana@student.shu.edu.

Author: Staff Writer

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